The story of the bicycle and its impact on Toronto at Bike City exhibit

Images courtesy of the City of Toronto.

Bike City: How industry, advocacy and infrastructure shaped Toronto's cycling culture

Today, the bicycle is a mainstream mode of transportation for a million riders in Toronto, yet sharing the road has been a challenge for city builders and city users for well over a century.

Showcasing 13 bicycles, archival photographs, early advertisements and artifacts from private and public collections, the new exhibit, Bike City, tells the story of the bicycle and its impact on Toronto, past, present and future.

The exhibit is on display until November 17, 2018, at the Market Gallery on the second floor of the St. Lawrence Market at 95 Front St. E and features cycling clothing, including this reproduction of a women's cycling garment from the late 1800s seen below, along with some really cool bikes. 

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Toronto VS Everybody Bike Month edition

Photo by Gary Davidson from the story Dykes on Bikes Bring Pedal Power to World Pride, in our 2014 print issue.

Toronto vs. Everybody the Bike Month wrap edition

By Tammy Thorne

Something strange happened to me on Bike to Work Day this year.

My boss told me to I had to get my driver’s license.

Bike to Work Day kicks off Bike Month in many places around the world. It’s largely symbolic – a way for a city to show it supports cycling, at least in theory – and my magazine, dandyhorse, has religiously covered it every year because of its symbolic importance. For me, Bike to Work Day is pretty much every day.

But this year on Bike to Work Day, I was summoned by my bosses to the boardroom to go over my qualifications for my marketing job.

I was told that in my role I was required to not only have a driver’s license, but also a car.

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Memorial Ride for Dalia Chako

Words and pictures by Jun Nogami

It's been an absolutely brutal week or so with three cyclists dying on the mean streets of Toronto, and another in Markham. This sudden spike in the number of deaths (taken together with several pedestrian deaths) has led to numerous calls for the city to do something. On June 8, Jonas Mitchell passed away in hospital of injuries incurred when he was hit by a car that ran a red light on Lakeshore Blvd. The very next day, Douglas Crosbie was killed on Dundas St E. The following day, Aaron Rinke-Wright was killed by an SUV in what appeared to be a targeted killing. The next week, Dalia Chako was killed by a flatbed truck at Bloor and St. George.

ARC (Advocacy for Respect for Cyclists) has been working overtime to arrange memorial rides for each of these victims.

Here are two pictures from the memorial ride for Jonas Mitchell.

Pictures of the ride for Aaron Rankin-Wright in NOW Toronto are available here.

Dalia Chakos died at Bloor and St. George. Even before tonight, people had left flowers in her memory.

Tonight was her memorial ride. A very large crowd gathered at Bloor and Spadina, a mere 300m from the crash site.

Dalia's son, Skylor Brummans, flew in from Minnesota to attend the ride. He was determined to use the news of his mother's untimely death to press for more safety for cyclists. Bless him.

Joey Schwartz makes some announcements to get us started. Since we had so many people, riding directly to the crash site would have been unwieldy so it was decided to ride north on Spadina Rd. to Bernard, then east to St. George, and down to Bloor.

 

Here we go.

Frequent Dandyhorse correspondent Martin Reis.

Right turn at Bernard.

South on St. George.

The ghost bike arrives at the crash site, the southeast corner of St. George and Bloor.

There are so many people here that we own the intersection.

 

Joey thanks everyone for attending, and then calls for a minute of silence.

People come forward to put flowers on the bike.

Skylor once again thanks the crowd and says that his mother would have been shocked had she known that hundreds of people would ride in her memory.
The decorated ghost bike.

RIP Dalia Chakos. Deepest condolences to her family and friends.

Update: a similar article with a mostly different selection of photos has been posted at Biking in a Big City.

 

 

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Toronto needs protected intersections now

Why Toronto needs protected intersections now

Story by Robert Zaichkowski 

This year has been a tragic one on Toronto’s roads with seventeen pedestrians and four cyclists killed during the first six months of this year. Many of these tragedies – including the recent collision killing 58-year-old Dalia Chako at Bloor and St. George – happened at intersections. If the city is serious about acting to make our roads safe, intersections are a good place to start.

Example of a protected intersection - Via Alta Planning

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